Teacher's guides, coloring pages and big picture books

Chris and Karen Jackson (editors), 2014.
Cameroon Association for Bible Translation and Literacy (CABTAL).

Lessons from Luke is a 52-lesson curriculum for children, based on the Gospel of Luke and developed in the North West region of Cameroon. It aims to provide an easy-to-follow series of lessons that are culturally appropriate and make use of teaching aids and illustrations found in a typical rural milieu.

Each lesson contains a teacher's guide, a coloring page with the memory verse and truth of the week, and a big picture book called a Flip Book in A3 format with the pictures from the Bible story section. There are also review lessons.

Lessons from Luke does not make use of any other portion of Scripture outside of the Gospel of Luke. The goal is to provide a tool with which language communities can start to engage with the mother-tongue Scriptures at the earliest possible opportunity once Luke is translated and approved for publication. It has been designed to be a bilingual document with the teaching content translated into local languages, keeping the repeated text and the teacher instructions in English-as-second-language support for new mother-tongue readers.

The first and second quarters (lessons 1-26) are available for download below and are released under a Creative Commons license. Quarters 3 and 4 can be found in Lessons from Luke 2.  [more...]

Marriage and culture in West Africa in the light of the Scriptures
Author: Michael Jemphrey, 2015

Michael Jemphrey describes a recent Gospel and Marriage workshop held in West Africa. It brought together the domains of Scripture engagement and anthropology, demonstrating the relevance of the translated Scriptures in addressing local cultural issues.

The workshop included:

  • Discussion of contextualisation and syncretism in the Bible and church history.
  • Overview of marriage in the Old and New Testaments.
  • Presentation of anthropological research methods.
  • Case studies of marriage challenges from different countries in West Africa.
  • Study of several problematic areas of marriage in West Africa in the light of the Scriptures (polygamy, levirate marriage, divorce and remarriage, bride price and the cost of weddings).
  • Research in groups of six delicate questions in the realm of marriage and proposals for contextualised local practices.
  • Production of radio programmes to present each challenge and proposal to the local populations.

Download the workshop description as a PDF document.  [more...]

Stories of Trauma and Healing
Published by: American Bible Society, 2014

Hope Rising documents transformed lives of trauma survivors who have found hope and healing through the Bible’s message of forgiveness and restoration.

"...people here and around the world suffering from the aftermath of trauma could never connect with the Bible in their current state. Without addressing the issue of trauma then much of the rest of the work of providing the Bible is in vain."

Around the world, 1 in 7 people have experienced the pain and horror of a traumatic event. In the Democratic Republic of the Congo, the country with the highest rate of sexual violence in the world, the rate of trauma is much higher. Trauma is a barrier to engaging with the Bible.

On the American Bible Society's Hope Rising website (HopeRising.tv) you can find the full and shortened versions of the documentary, together with a Bible study guide, sermon topics and discussion resources for churches.  [more...]

What facilitates and hinders Scripture engagement in the Minyanka churches of Mali?
Author: Richard Margetts

MA dissertation: All Nations, UK (2013)

Abstract:

The coming of the New Testament in 2006 heralded a new era of Scripture engagement for the Minyanka people of Mali. This paper evaluates the factors that have facilitated and hindered the process of interacting with God’s Word. It includes an examination of the role of Bible understanding, literacy and methods of oral communication as well as the relationship between the Bible agency and the local churches.

The research takes an exploratory approach in which a review of existing literature and initial interviews helped to formulate a research questionnaire which was carried out in Minyanka churches. The results of the survey became the subject of discussion in follow-up interviews with Malian Bible translators, pastors and expatriate colleagues in order to interpret the data. This was combined with documentary research into Scripture engagement in the history of the Minyanka church and in reports of recent activities.

The testimonies of change and transformation demonstrate that the translated Scriptures are making a difference. Scripture engagement is taking place as people read their New Testaments, listen to the audio Scriptures and tune into Minyanka radio programmes.

But this paper also shows that there is no room for complacency. There is an urgent call for basic Bible teaching and ongoing literacy classes. Pastors have an especially important role to play and need to be given encouragement, time, resources and training to more effectively facilitate Scripture engagement. Their choice of communication methods and their availability to answer questions from the Bible has a considerable influence on the way people interact with the Scriptures.

Spiritual transformation is a desired outcome of Scripture engagement, but it is not necessarily immediate and certainly not automatic. As Bible agencies have learnt in the West, it is possible to have access to Scripture and some of the best resources and programmes, but fail to be changed by God’s Word. In this sense, Minyanka Christians are no different from Christians anywhere else in the world, facing the challenge of making Scripture engagement a priority amid the many distractions in life.

Download as a PDF document below:  [more...]

Author: Matt Valler
Published by: The Alchemy Project, 2014

In this TED-style presentation, Alchemy Project Director, Matt Valler, explores a future for how we use the Bible. Drawing on 4 global mega-trends, Matt details profound cultural changes that are happening all over the world and proposes an approach to the future of Scripture Engagement that responds to these challenges as an opportunity to create something profoundly new.

  [more...]
A simple guide to begin or advance your use of mobiles
Published by: International Mission Board (2014)

The heart of ministry is relationship. While mobile devices offer capabilities in mass sharing of the Gospel, they are ultimately a great tool for effective ongoing outreach and in building relationships.

Updated edition, September 2014

If you're looking for an introduction to using mobile phones in Christian ministry - both feature phones and smartphones, the updated Mobile Ministry Made Easy handbook is a great place to start.

It takes you through the basics, pointing you in the direction of helpful resources and suggesting strategic approaches to using the mobile phone to facilitate Scripture engagement in evangelism, discipleship, leadership development and equipping new churches.

Included in the guide is: an overview of using microSD cards and Bluetooth to share Scripture content, preparing videos for mobile distribution, advice on choosing a device and accessories, and guidelines on safety and security.  [more...]

An interactive journey through the Old Testament
Author: Jennifer Wright

In this detailed 17-page workshop guide from the Ndop region of North West Cameroon, Jennifer Wright describes how participants were taken on an interactive journey through the Old Testament:

What?
The Bible Overview Workshop is a two day workshop for leaders of church groups, such as listening group leaders and Sunday School teachers, with the aim of giving a basic knowledge of the overall Bible story and particularly aspects of the Old Testament which are important for understanding the New Testament.

Why?
We had trained people to be listening group leaders and children’s leaders, and they were generally doing well, however we realised that due to limited knowledge of the Old Testament, some were finding it challenging to lead their group because they were not prepared for the kind of questions that could come up unexpectedly when listening to or reading the New Testament – for example about the priests, the sacrificial system, the Passover feast, etc. Although they knew a lot of Bible stories, many did not have a very clear idea of what order they come in and how it all fits together.

How?
Geography: We had a simple map of the Ancient Near East on the wall and the whole room was set up to match the map. The participants moved around the room as they engaged with the material so they gained an understanding of the layout of the places we were talking about and the movements of the people of Israel, from Abraham’s first journey to Canaan to the return from Exile.

Timeline: Each participant received a blank timeline at the beginning of the course, and there was a large version of it on the wall. As we went through the material, we completed the timeline on the wall and the participants completed their own timelines to match it so they could take it home with them.

Telling Bible Stories together: We selected a set of stories to give a coherent summary of the Old Testament. Some stories which were well known to the participants were covered very briefly by letting them summarise them or in some cases act them out. Other stories were narrated or read from the Bible.

Questions: For several key passages, we asked questions based on the text in order to encourage discussion and bring out key points, especially when they would be referred to later. We also gave space for participants to ask questions.

Discussion topics – e.g. we finished the first day by making a large model Tabernacle (out of people, benches, a sheet, cardboard boxes, etc.) and then having a discussion of sacrifices, comparing the Old Testament sacrificial system to the local village’s sacrificial system.

Download a full description of the workshop as a PDF document.  [more...]

Author: Margaret Hill

Today we are in a very different position from when Bible agencies and churches first started running literacy classes. There are alternatives! We now have many methods of producing, distributing and copying oral Scriptures of many different types. In almost every case where a literacy programme is going nowhere, people will accept oral Scriptures and listen to them.

Several years ago, Margaret Hill wrote an article provocatively titled "How Literacy can Harm Scripture Use". Her thesis was that too many literacy programmes were starting with classes for beginners rather than focusing on transition literacy for the leaders and change agents in society. Such an approach, she argued, is harmful to Scripture engagement.

This article is a follow-up, emphasising the same message and going further to take into account the observation that "increasingly here in Africa we are seeing that many language groups are very interested in using their languages orally, but very uninterested in reading or writing in them".

Rather than "hitting your head against a wall" with struggling literacy programmes, the author calls for a refocusing of strategies and reminds us that audio Scriptures often work very well in such contexts.

Download the article as a PDF document.  [more...]