Audio

Author: Richard Margetts

Help! Hardly anyone can read the translated Scriptures. What can we do?

This is a one-page poster or course handout. It reminds us that if a lack of literacy skills is cited as a barrier to Scripture use, then the solution can be found in both literacy and oral strategies. Good Scripture use promotion strategies will often need to move in both of these directions.

So, if people say "The New Testament is not being used because people can't read it!", the response is not only "OK, we'd better do some literacy so they can read it". It should also be: "OK, we need to explore ways of them getting to hear it as well."  [more...]

Author: Lausanne Movement

"We affirm that the Bible is the final written word of God, not surpassed by any further revelation, but we also rejoice that the Holy Spirit illumines the minds of God’s people so that the Bible continues to speak God’s truth in fresh ways to people in every culture... We must make the Bible known by all means possible, for its message is for all people on earth. We recommit ourselves, therefore, to the ongoing task of translating, disseminating and teaching the scriptures in every culture and language, including those that are predominantly oral or non-literary."

The Lausanne Movement has published a draft of Part 1 of The Cape Town Commitment - a statement to follow on from the Lausanne Covenant (1974) and the Manilla Manifesto (1989). It includes a section entitled "We love God's Word".

The role of Scripture In Mission was a special focus at the Third Lausanne Congress on World Evangelization.

Translations are available in several languages. Part 2 (our call to action) will be published by December as a result of reflections from the Congress.  [more...]

Author: Jacob Finifrock

The living model of the transformation of a donkey, along with the use and application of Scripture left a profound impact on all of us who were involved.

This report describes how a team went to help promote the use of the newly translated Tharaka New Testament in Kenya. They found their most effective approach was training pastors and community leaders in how to train their donkeys! Finifrock describes the observations that led to this idea, the training used, and the Scriptures applied.  [more...]

Putting psychological and medical principles in a Biblical framework
Author: Margaret Hill

People need information, whether medical, or psychological—how people normally react to stress and trauma. Secondly, they need to know what God says about it—through Scripture readings and discussions.

Many parts of Africa today are affected by wars, rebel groups and civil unrest. Even without these, there are armed robberies, horrific road accidents, domestic violence, and the increasing shadow of AIDS. However, literature addressing trauma generally comes either from a medical perspective or a biblical one. This article outlines how mental health and trauma healing has been addressed in Scripture Use seminars. A manual has been developed to facilitate such training.  [more...]

Shaping the thinking of teens outside the church
Author: David Benson

"Most of our Scripture Engagement tools are geared toward teens who are relatively open to the Scriptures though perhaps struggle to see the relevance. But what about the antagonistic atheists and seculars who favour naturalistic science over the implausible supernatural; the untrusting skeptics and agnostics who find the historical and moral assertions in the Bible literally in-credible; or the confused seekers and New Agers who want meaning to their life but are suspicious of any (religious) truth claims—no matter how seemingly relevant—lest they be duped and lose their “freedom”?"

Encountering God’s Word has the potential to transform teens outside the church. But what if their attitude to the Bible closes their ears? How can we open ears, establish trust, and arouse interest? Sometimes we need to talk about the Bible before we can invite teens to read it. These resources unpack a pre-evangelistic conversational strategy that challenges, informs, and inspires teens to see the Bible as plausible, credible, and relevant.

Dave Benson has researched the area and is actively using the model he presents here in Australian schools. Attached here is the booklet and presentation he produced for the World Wide Scripture Engagement Consultation 2009 - and a copy of his thesis 'The Thinking Teen'.  [more...]

Author: Richard Margetts

Which media do we use for providing access to audio Scriptures?

In the past the answer was easy: it was the audio cassette tape, and perhaps the radio. Today there are so many more choices. This document illustrates the wide range of options:

  • Removable media (cassettes, CDs, memory cards)
  • Broadcast media (radio)
  • Digital audio players (MegaVoice Envoy, Proclaimer, Saber, Talking Bible, Audibible, etc.)
  • New media (smartphone apps, MP3 downloads, social media, etc.)

The choice we make will depend very much on the local situation and will often include more than one of these options.  [more...]

Listening to the translated Scriptures: a review of today’s digital audio players
Author: Richard Margetts

Third Edition - Revised for 2014

This in-depth review (46 pages) compares a range of today's digital audio players including the Proclaimer and Mini-Proclaimer (from Faith Comes By Hearing), the Envoy S and Story Teller (from MegaVoice), the Saber (from Global Recordings Network), the Papyrus (from Renew World Outreach) and the Audibible (from Davar Partners International).

The review is presented in several sections, illustrated with photos and giving a summary of the key features, prices, pros and cons of each player. Also mentioned are feature phones, smartphones and locally available MP3 players.

The first edition of the document was published in 2008 and compared the Proclaimer, MegaVoice Ambassador and Saber. In the past six years we have seen:

  1. New entrants to the digital audio player world: the Papyrus, the Audibible, the Story Teller, Mini Proclaimer, the Herald and the Shofar.
  2. Significant development of existing players: The MegaVoice Ambassadors were retired and replaced by the Envoy. A solar-powered version of the Talking Bible is available, as is a new version of the Proclaimer. More internal memory was added to the Papyrus.
  3. New battery technology: Most players now use newer Lithium Ion Polymer or Lithium Iron Phosphate batteries rather than the NiMH type.
  4. Digital file sharing: Almost gone are the days of cassette tape. In most countries of the world, people are interacting with digital media and are increasingly familiar with memory cards and MP3 files.
  5. Mobile phones: The incredible growth in mobile phone ownership and use over the past six years means that most of the world’s population now have their own personal audio player.
  6. Download the full report as a PDF document.

  [more...]
Author: Gordon Fee

We miss a great deal of the New Testament... because we are so poorly informed about the Old. And the point to make here is that the first readers of these New Testament documents, those whose heirs we have become, had a much greater awareness of what was going on not simply because it was written to them, in their language and culture, but because they were biblically literate in ways that most contemporary Christians are not.

In this lecture, Gordon Fee examines some of the Reasons why Christians read their Bibles poorly. He then points out some of the Results of this reality; and third, he points toward some Remedies.

Among the reasons cited for poor reading are: the over-stimulation of the senses making sustained reading difficult, the non-contextual individualization of verses, the fragmentation and flattening of Scripture. The negative results of this mean that people have 'a terribly fragmented understanding' of what the Bible is all about.

Fee proposes the following remedies:

1. People need to learn to read in meaningful sections.
2. People need to learn to read Scripture aloud.
3. Most people will need to read with some kind of guide.

  [more...]
Author: Sue A. Harris

The availability of Scripture in the traditional language is not enough to ensure shifting the patterns of language use already established in the church.

In the Galat community the traditional language is used for informal, in-group communication in the domains of family, friends, and neighbourhood. Harris discusses how this affects the use of mother-tongue literature and suggests that it is most effective to create new functions for literature use in domains that are appropriate in the community. Rather than expecting the church (a formal context) to use the mother tongue, she suggests home Bible studies or preschools as better environments to use mother-tongue literature.  [more...]