Engaging Different Audiences

Read, Reflect, Remember, Respond
Author: Lawson Murray
Published by: Scripture Union Canada (2017)

About the book (from the Bible Engagement Basics web page):

Do Christians really know what the Bible is and the difference it can make in their lives?
Are Christians being equipped to dynamically connect with God’s Word? Is the Bible being read as God intended? According to Bible engagement advocate, Dr. Lawson Murray, the answer is no. He says, “Most Christians are unsure about how they should interact with the Bible. They’re confused about what it is, how to read it, and how to apply it to their lives.”

Vision for Bible Engagement Basics
“The vision for this book is not to help more people read the Bible,” says Murray. “The fact that only 2 out of 10 Christians will read the Bible from cover to cover isn’t really the problem. The real problem is relational - people aren’t connecting with Jesus. That’s why this book’s about learning how to engage with the Bible in order to meet with Jesus and live in harmony with His Story.”

Contents
Each chapter looks at a different aspect of Bible engagement and provides tips to help a reader read, reflect, remember and respond to God's Word.

The book is divided into 3 sections: Principles (Theme, Authority, Story, and more), Practices (Interpreting, Reflecting, Spoken Word, Journaling and more) and Paradigms (Children, Millenials, Small Groups and more).  [more...]

Help Your Young People Enjoy Life with the Bible
Author: Adrian Blenkinsop
Published by: Bible Society Australia, 2013

"The Bible According to Gen Z" is a collection of essays from Australia on encouraging Bible engagement among young people. It includes research results and analysis, together with responses from youth leaders and case studies.

Here are some selected quotes:

"The study showed that the best way to encourage young people to read the Bible is to encourage them to participate in a Bible reading group."

"Encouraging the sharing of ideas, opinions and questions around a passage is also vital for young people to dig into Scripture, and have a sense of 'discovery' and shared learning."

"Many young people read very little, especially in the form of books... Bible reading requires a sustained effort of a kind that is 'uncomfortable' for many young people."

"Individualism and post-traditionalism has meant that life is approached in a very flexible manner... Few young people develop strong habitual or structured daily activities, except in relation to the demands of school and work... The mobile phone has encouraged this unstructured approach to life. Hence, few young people develop structured habits of daily Bible reading."

"There's one core issue that sits at the heart of young people not 'getting into' the Bible. It may seem harsh - but it's simply that there is a consistent lack of modelling of Bible engagement from leaders. If the leaders of young people are not engaging with the Bible, the clear message to those they influence is that the Bible is not important."

"When Bible engagement is done in non-interactive, non-creative ways, it often reinforces the lack of importance and relevance of the Bible in the minds of young people."

"Experiencing the Bible as relevant depends on the attitudes one brings to it. If young people read it simply as stories of long ago, it had little relevance. If they read it as God's communication today, they were far more likely to experience it as relevant to life."

"For the young people who do read the Bible, there is often a frustration with the 'non-immediacy' of it (the fast-food approach to the Bible)."

Available as an e-book or printed book.  [more...]

Author: Ellen Errington (2016)

The experience of going to church is largely an oral one in any culture. This is perfectly acceptable and appropriate, but there are ways that the experience of participating in church activities can be complementary to developing literacy skills and literate practice for daily life.

In this paper, Ellen Errington applies the concept of scaffolding to the task of teaching people from oral cultures the skills of reading and writing. By supporting the learner through these means, literate practice may seem less foreign and new avenues of communication may be opened up. Scaffolding techniques are really just good teaching practices, but for learners from oral cultures, literacy teachers need to use them more often and more intentionally to build success.

The church, though primarily an oral setting, can also be a setting for supporting literate practice, including Bible ‘literacy,’ for all church members. The inclusion of scaffolding techniques for oral literacy learners in the church setting can bring excitement and deeper understanding to all who participate.  [more...]

A Strategy for Promoting the Use of the Vernacular Scriptures in the Cameroon Baptist Convention Churches in Nso’ Tribe, Cameroon
Author: Shey Samuel Ngeh

MTh thesis, South African Theological Seminary (2015)

Abstract:

This research was prompted by the observation that there is minimal use of Lamnso’ Scriptures in Baptist churches in Nso’, even though the Lamnso’ New Testament has been available since 1990. It was also observed that the active participation of Nso’ Christians in Bible studies done in Lamnso’ points to great prospects for the extensive use of Lamnso’ Scriptures.

The author of this thesis seeks to devise a strategy for promoting Lamnso’ Scriptures for extensive use. He consulted academic works to find out what others have written regarding the importance of mother tongue Scriptures and conducted a historical analysis to find out how historical factors have shaped the attitude of Baptist churches towards Scriptures in Lamnso’. He did an empirical study by sending questionnaires to fifty-seven Baptist churches, receiving feedback. The data collected was analyzed and interpreted.

The result shows that even though Lamnso’ Scriptures are indispensable to spiritual maturity among Nso’ Baptist Christians, their use in evangelism and discipleship do not reflect their importance. This is due to lack of a proper strategy and biblical teaching on the importance of mother tongue Scriptures. Consequently, the author has proposed a theological framework to provide a theological basis for setting forth a strategy for promoting Lamnso’ Scriptures.

The theological framework is followed by a practical framework based on the historical and empirical analyses, as well as the theological obligations of the church. The author contends that proposed solutions, recommendations and action plans with practical steps must be implemented by individual Baptist Christians, churches, Baptist theological institutions and the Cameroon Baptist Convention at large so that Lamnso’ Scriptures assume their proper place in evangelism and discipleship for the growth of the church.  [more...]

English and French teacher's guides, coloring pages and big picture books

Chris and Karen Jackson (eds.), 2015
Cameroon Association for Bible Translation and Literacy (CABTAL).

Lessons from Luke is a 52-lesson curriculum for children, based on the Gospel of Luke and developed in the North West region of Cameroon. It aims to provide an easy-to-follow series of lessons that are culturally appropriate and make use of teaching aids and illustrations found in a typical rural milieu.

This version of Lessons from Luke is known as the Economy Version. It is the version of the curriculum that is currently being implemented in Cameroon and elsewhere. The only difference between this version and the original version published in January 2015 under the same title is the number of pictures used in the stories and in the FlipBooks. With the number of pictures reduced, the FlipBooks have been reformatted so that there are now four in total, one for each quarter. Each FlipBook contains 39 pictures used to illustrate the stories. Beyond that, the actual content of the lessons has not changed.

The reduced number of pictures results in a major reduction in the cost and complexity of producing the curriculum. Yet there has not been a loss of effectiveness. The minimum number of pictures used in a lesson is three, while some lessons have four and five pictures depending on what is needed to best support the story of the lesson.  [more...]

Teacher's guides, coloring pages and big picture books

Chris and Karen Jackson (editors), 2014.
Cameroon Association for Bible Translation and Literacy (CABTAL).

This is the second set of resources for Lessons from Luke. The third and fourth quarters (lessons 27-52) are available for download below and are released under a Creative Commons license.

For the first and second quarters (lessons 1-26) and an introduction to Lessons from Luke, please see Lessons from Luke 1.

Lessons from Luke is a 52-lesson curriculum for children, based on the Gospel of Luke and developed in the North West region of Cameroon. It aims to provide an easy-to-follow series of lessons that are culturally appropriate and make use of teaching aids and illustrations found in a typical rural milieu.  [more...]

Teacher's guides, coloring pages and big picture books

Chris and Karen Jackson (editors), 2014.
Cameroon Association for Bible Translation and Literacy (CABTAL).

Lessons from Luke is a 52-lesson curriculum for children, based on the Gospel of Luke and developed in the North West region of Cameroon. It aims to provide an easy-to-follow series of lessons that are culturally appropriate and make use of teaching aids and illustrations found in a typical rural milieu.

Each lesson contains a teacher's guide, a coloring page with the memory verse and truth of the week, and a big picture book called a Flip Book in A3 format with the pictures from the Bible story section. There are also review lessons.

Lessons from Luke does not make use of any other portion of Scripture outside of the Gospel of Luke. The goal is to provide a tool with which language communities can start to engage with the mother-tongue Scriptures at the earliest possible opportunity once Luke is translated and approved for publication. It has been designed to be a bilingual document with the teaching content translated into local languages, keeping the repeated text and the teacher instructions in English-as-second-language support for new mother-tongue readers.

The first and second quarters (lessons 1-26) are available for download below and are released under a Creative Commons license. Quarters 3 and 4 can be found in Lessons from Luke 2.  [more...]