Engaging Different Audiences

Published by: Barna Group (2013)

The Millennial generation of young people are known as "digital natives". According to recent research carried out by the Barna Group in the USA:

"the most common way Millennials are blending their faith and technology is through digital reading of Scripture. It’s an escalating trend, considering there are just as many YouVersion (the free Bible phone app) downloads as there are Instagram downloads. And BibleGateway.com has become one of the top Christian websites today."

The research found that:

"Seven out of 10 of practicing Christian Millennials (70%) read Scripture on a screen. One-third of all Millennials says they read sacred Scripture on a phone or online, demonstrating how broadly the digital trends are shaping this generation."

In addition, 38% of practicing Christian Millennials said they search the Internet to verify something a faith leader has said. This might be during a sermon, as many bring their smartphones or tablets to church with them.  [more...]

A Student's Manual for Scripture Use
Author: Edna Headland

Pastors who have studied in a language other than their mother tongue can have difficulty using the local language Scriptures. When they preach, they sometimes borrow words from the language in which they studied, rather than thinking about the word that will communicate best in their local language.

For this reason Bible Institutes, seminaries and churches should encourage those who study the Bible to use the translation in their own language and investigate how important terms were translated.

On completing this 43 lesson course, a speaker with the Scriptures in their own language will be able to:

  • identify how key terms in their language are translated;
  • use the terms when they teach or preach;
  • better understand the doctrine based on or related to the key term;
  • attach greater value to the Scriptures in their language since they know that there are appropriate ways to communicate key terms in their own language and that it may change according to the context;
  • use the Scriptures with more confidence and motivate other people in their ethnic group to do so.

The course is also available in Spanish and Portuguese.  [more...]

Teacher's guides, coloring pages and big picture books

Chris and Karen Jackson (editors), 2014.
Cameroon Association for Bible Translation and Literacy (CABTAL).

Lessons from Luke is a 52-lesson curriculum for children, based on the Gospel of Luke and developed in the North West region of Cameroon. It aims to provide an easy-to-follow series of lessons that are culturally appropriate and make use of teaching aids and illustrations found in a typical rural milieu.

Each lesson contains a teacher's guide, a coloring page with the memory verse and truth of the week, and a big picture book called a Flip Book in A3 format with the pictures from the Bible story section. There are also review lessons.

Lessons from Luke does not make use of any other portion of Scripture outside of the Gospel of Luke. The goal is to provide a tool with which language communities can start to engage with the mother-tongue Scriptures at the earliest possible opportunity once Luke is translated and approved for publication. It has been designed to be a bilingual document with the teaching content translated into local languages, keeping the repeated text and the teacher instructions in English-as-second-language support for new mother-tongue readers.

The first and second quarters (lessons 1-26) are available for download below and are released under a Creative Commons license. Quarters 3 and 4 can be found in Lessons from Luke 2.  [more...]

English and French teacher's guides, coloring pages and big picture books

Chris and Karen Jackson (eds.), 2015
Cameroon Association for Bible Translation and Literacy (CABTAL).

Lessons from Luke is a 52-lesson curriculum for children, based on the Gospel of Luke and developed in the North West region of Cameroon. It aims to provide an easy-to-follow series of lessons that are culturally appropriate and make use of teaching aids and illustrations found in a typical rural milieu.

This version of Lessons from Luke is known as the Economy Version. It is the version of the curriculum that is currently being implemented in Cameroon and elsewhere. The only difference between this version and the original version published in January 2015 under the same title is the number of pictures used in the stories and in the FlipBooks. With the number of pictures reduced, the FlipBooks have been reformatted so that there are now four in total, one for each quarter. Each FlipBook contains 39 pictures used to illustrate the stories. Beyond that, the actual content of the lessons has not changed.

The reduced number of pictures results in a major reduction in the cost and complexity of producing the curriculum. Yet there has not been a loss of effectiveness. The minimum number of pictures used in a lesson is three, while some lessons have four and five pictures depending on what is needed to best support the story of the lesson.  [more...]

Teacher's guides, coloring pages and big picture books

Chris and Karen Jackson (editors), 2014.
Cameroon Association for Bible Translation and Literacy (CABTAL).

This is the second set of resources for Lessons from Luke. The third and fourth quarters (lessons 27-52) are available for download below and are released under a Creative Commons license.

For the first and second quarters (lessons 1-26) and an introduction to Lessons from Luke, please see Lessons from Luke 1.

Lessons from Luke is a 52-lesson curriculum for children, based on the Gospel of Luke and developed in the North West region of Cameroon. It aims to provide an easy-to-follow series of lessons that are culturally appropriate and make use of teaching aids and illustrations found in a typical rural milieu.  [more...]

Published by: Lion Hudson

Five years ago Lion Hudson (a UK based publisher) was approached by the United Bible Societies with the need for an illustrated re-telling of the Bible narrative that was suitable for a wide age range including adults, culturally appropriate for non Western readers and which could be printed at a price that made it affordable for a mass market in the two thirds world with minimum or no subsidy. The organisations settled on a long-standing and successful title - The Lion Children's Bible - as the book that best met this requirement.  [more...]

A church-based literacy program for Ghana
Author: Pat Herbert

The pastor will find that not only can his congregation read the Scriptures in their own language, but they will show a greater depth of understanding God’s Word and show growth in their Christian lives.

Community literacy projects have been running in Ghana since the 1970s. Pastors, however, were not using the mother-tongue Scriptures in their churches. To address this problem, Pat Herbert describes how they developed Scripture Guides to accompany literacy primers. The program is now known as Literacy for Life (LFL). The article includes a sample of a Scripture Guide lesson, and discusses various issues, including training of teachers to use the materials, making it a church-based program, and funding for the primers and Scripture Guides. It compares the normal literacy programs to the LFL program and describes the impact the program has had.  [more...]